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Scrapbook

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Creator:Hamilton County (Tenn.). Department of Education
Title:Scrapbook
Date:1960 Aug. 1-1960 Dec. 31
Description:

Maroon and gold scrapbook. Contains newspaper articles about Chattanooga Public Schools. Dates of articles are August 1 through December 31, 1960. Articles glued onto pages. Dates of the articles are written on pages next to the articles. Scrapbook held together by maroon cord. The articles focus on the integration issue sit-ins, demonstrations, and political races that obviously affect schools. August 1, 1960: There are nine articles for this date, two from the Chattanooga Times (hereafter referred to as the Times), and seven from the Chattanooga News Free Press (hereafter referred to as the Free Press). The first Times article is an editorial that praises Estes Kefauver for his commitment to his constituents and argues that he is connected to the people of Tennessee like few other politicians have been connected to their voters. The author urges readers to vote for Kefauver in the Democratic primary for US Senate. The second Times article is a letter to the editor defending Kefauver against the numerous, in this author's opinion, unfair attacks that had been leveled against the incumbent Senator. The first Free Press article is a letter to the editor that attacks Kefauver's record and argues that far from being smeared by his primary opponent, Kefauver had smeared himself with his own votes and actions as Senator. The second Free Press article is an editorial that attacks Senator Kefauver on his votes for the Civil Rights Acts of 1957 and 1960, and contains a point by point breakdown of some of the Act's "unconstitutional" and "anti-southern" provisions. The author urges his readers to vote for Andrew Taylor, as he was opposed to both civil rights bills. The third Free Press article is an editorial arguing that Lyndon Johnson was being used as a "Judas goat" to buy off southern opposition to the Kennedy ticket for President, and that his nomination as vice president was intended to distract southern voters from the most radical civil rights platform of any major party in history. The fourth Free Press article is an editorial highlighting the relationship Estes Kefauver had with NAACP lawyer Frank Reeves. The article also points out that Reeves was travelling with the Kennedy campaign. The connection between Reeves and Kefauver was meant to show how cozy Kefauver was with blacks and how he would vote at the behest of the NAACP and against the interest of racist whites in Tennessee. The fifth Free Press article is a letter to the editor lamenting the fact that both major political parties had "sold out" on civil rights with not a segregationist between them, and believes that a third party would be the answer. The sixth Free Press article is a letter to the editor opposing any kind of integration, and supporting the candidacy of Andrew Taylor in his race against Estes Kefauver. The seventh Free Press article is a letter to the editor supporting Kefauver in his reelection bid for the US Senate. August 2, 1960: There are five articles for this date, two from the Times, and three from the Free Press. The first Times article is an editorial arguing that there are not that many big differences between Kefauver and his opponent Taylor, especially on the issue of the federal government and its most important programs. The second Times article is a letter to the editor, written by a New Yorker, praising the south, its people, customs, and culture, and urges them to resist changing their ways so as not to become like the "cesspools" of the north. The first Free Press article is an editorial supporting the candidacy of Andrew Taylor and opposing the reelection of Estes Kefauver. The second Free Press article is a letter to the editor supporting the reelection of Kefauver. The third Free Press article is a letter to the editor opposing the reelection of Kefauver and supporting his opponent Andrew Taylor. August 3, 1960: There are five articles for this date, all from the Free Press. The first article is an editorial supporting Andrew Taylor in his primary bid against incumbent Senator Kefauver. The second Free Press is a letter to the editor supporting the reelection of Kefauver. The third article is a letter to the editor opposing Kefauver and supporting Taylor. The fourth article is a letter to the editor saying that it makes sense for blacks to support Kefauver, but makes no sense for whites to support him. The fifth article is a letter to the editor opposing Taylor and supporting Kefauver. August 4, 1960: There are three articles, two photos and a cut out of a headline, all from the Free Press. The first article is a letter to the editor denouncing Andrew Taylor, and supporting Estes Kefauver in the Democratic primary election for US Senator. The second article is an editorial bemoaning the proposed rules change in the Senate that would limit debate, making it harder for a filibuster to be mounted. The intent of these rule changes were to make it easier to get civil rights legislation through the Senate. The author of this editorial believed that this would stifle the voice of southern lawmakers who were opposed to civil rights legislation, and the author argues that the change in the rules was an attack on the separation of powers and the constitution itself. The first photo included for this date shows a long line of almost all black voters waiting their turn to vote in the Democratic Primary for US Senator. The caption under the photo reads "This was a typical scene in some of the downtown controlled wards today as heavy voting was reported. This photograph was taken in the fifth ward about an hour after the polls opened. Temporarily stalled voting machines halted voting and backed up the line until the mechanical difficulty was cleared." The second photo shows a black woman sitting on a porch, and posted next to her is a large photo featuring the image of Kefauver, with the words Kefauver and Holt prominently displayed. The caption under the photo reads, "This plainly marked instruction house in the Fourth Ward was located just off the school grounds, where the polls were held. Ward boss Walter Robinson sat next door under another sign which read 'Maddox for sheriff'." The third article describes the process that occurred in the black wards of Chattanooga on voting day, from hired cars taking voters to the poll, to shouts of "One Fifteen", indicating that the candidates in position one and fifteen, Kefauver and Dave Eldridge were the ones people should cast their ballots for. The headline for this date reads, "Record Seen In Heavy Voting", and features a picture of one of the cars hired to drive voters to the polls prominently displaying stickers for Estes Kefauver and Dave Eldridge. August 5, 1960: There are seven articles for this date, two from the Times, and five from the Free Press. The first Times article reports that Estes Kefauver's smashing triumph in his race for renomination to the US Senate was surely the greatest of his 22 year career in the Congress. It further established him at the very top rung among great campaigners in Tennessee history. The article also reports that Kefauver won by over 200,000 votes. The second Times article reports that a 17 year old white girl reported to police late Thursday night that she was seized and raped by four black youths as she and a youth, also 17, sat in a car parked on a ridge between Alton Park and St. Elmo. The first Free Press article is an editorial lamenting the victory of Estes Kefauver over his opponent Andrew Taylor. The author sees Kefauver's victory as evidence of the indifference of Tennessee voters to forced integration and the "unconstitutional so-called civil rights legislation" that Kefauver had voted for as Senator. The second Free Press article is a letter to the editor written by a conservative northerner who was disappointed to see what he called the failure of the south to effectively fight for their principles, like segregation and racism. The author was disheartened by the actions of the national parties and their stand on civil rights and integration, and would have liked to see southerners mount a stronger fight against the parties, like in 1948 with the "principled" Dixiecrats. The third Free Press article reports the same story as the Times article regarding the alleged rape of a white girl by four black youths. The fourth Free Press article reports on the massive victory of Kefauver over his primary opponent Taylor by a margin of over 200,000 votes. The fifth Free Press article contains several articles with detailed breakdowns of vote totals of all the different races held on August 4th. August 6, 1960: There are six articles for this date, three from the Times, and three from the Free Press. The first Times article breaks down the Kefauver vs. Taylor race and details the outcomes from the different regions of Tennessee and explains the reasons for the huge Kefauver victory. The second Times article reports that seven downtown lunch counters served blacks at a prearranged time in the afternoon. The servings were accomplished quietly and without fanfare or any complications. The lunch counters were all hit with sit-in protests over the past months. The third Times article reported a shotgun attack by two white youths, one masked by a scarf, on a young black man and a girl on the grounds of Frank Trotter School at 4700 Kirkland Ave. in Alton Park was reported to police authorities. The two black youths were wounded but survived. The first Free Press article is an editorial that draws an association between the Kefauver victory and the decision by seven lunch counters in Chattanooga to serve black patrons. The author argues that this decision was caving in to coercion and believes that this is going to lead to more coercion by civil rights activists. The second Free Press article is an editorial in which the author expounds on some ideas about government. The third Free Press article is an editorial expressing indignation over the alleged rape of a white girl by black youths, and over the shotgun attack by whites on black youths. The author expresses the desire that there be no blow and counter blow between the races. August 7, 1960: There are two articles for this date, all from the Times. The first article is an opinion piece and expresses approval that Hamilton County voters supported Estes Kefauver in his primary election. The author argues that for too long Hamilton County had the reputation of being staunchly in support of segregation, and with the vote for Kefauver, he hopes that some common sense would be brought to bear on the integration issue in Hamilton County. The second Times article reports that white merchants in 28 southern cities had desegregated their lunch counters without incident or reported business losses. The change grew out of Negro student sit-in demonstrations, some met with violence, and "selective buying" campaigns. The movement began in February 1960 in Greensboro, North Carolina. August 8, 1960: There are seven articles for this date, one from the Times and six from the Free Press. The Times article reported that a 23 years old Negro had been charged with raping a 17 year old white girl. The first Free Press article is a letter to the editor in which the author gloats over the Kefauver win. The second Free Press article is a letter to the editor expressing dismay over the vote for Kefauver and what the author sees as Tennessee losing its southern principles. The third Free Press article is a letter to the editor in which the author declares his pride in himself and his state for their support of Kefauver. The fourth Free Press article reports on the arrest and charging of a 23 year old black man in the rape of a 17 year old white girl. The fifth Free Press article is an editorial urging diligence in the tracking down and prosecution of the men responsible for the rape of a 17 year old white girl. The sixth Free Press article is an editorial and takes exception with an article that appeared in "Minutes", a magazine for the Nationwide Insurance Company. In the Minutes article, the author urges citizens to engage in civil disobedience, like sit-ins, and argues that this is an effective way to change policy and shape the course of history. The author of the Free Press editorial vehemently disagrees and calls demonstrations like sit-ins coercion and the accuses the author of the Minutes article of trying to stir up mob rule. August 9, 1960: There are eight article for this date, two from the Times, and six from the Free Press. The first Times article reports that detective authorities completed a four day investigation of the rape of a 17year old white girl with the announcement that six Negroes, one of whom was booked, were being held on statutory charges. Four were booked on charges of rape and the others were accused of being accessories to the crime. The second Times article is an editorial expressing appreciation for the good police work that led to the arrest of suspects in the rape case of a 17 year old girl. The first Free Press article is and editorial also expressing appreciation for the quick and efficient police work that led to the arrest of suspects in the case of the rape of a 17 year old girl. The third Free Press article reports on the six men being held in connection with the rape of a 17 year old white girl. The fourth Free Press article is an editorial criticizing President Eisenhower for promoting civil rights and setting up federal mechanisms that would investigate the integration question and would come up with ways to enforce the Supreme Court's ruling on integration.The fifth Free Press article is a letter to the editor written by a self-identified segregationist who believes that Tennessee voters sided with northern liberals in the last election. The sixth Free Press article is a letter to the editor in which the author writes that the defeat of Andrew Taylor by Kefauver was a blow to the south and a boost to liberalism and communism. August 10, 1960: There are seven articles for this date, two from the Times, and five from the Free Press. The first Times article reported that a statement deploring the Alton Park rape case and urging speedy and impartial justice was issued by Dr. M.J. Jones, president of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance and pastor of the Stanley Methodist Church. The second Times article reports that six Negroes being held in connection with the rape of a 17year old white girl were scheduled to have preliminary hearings in city court and juvenile court. The first Free Press article reports that the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance was urging speedy and impartial justice in the Alton Park rape case. The second Free Press article is a letter to the editor laying out a case for why the south should vote for the GOP in the November 1960 elections. The third Free Press article reports that city police received a report that a group of about 20 white youths attacked and severely wounded four teenage Negro boys near St. Elmo. The fourth Free Press article reported that three 16 year old Negro boys were arrested by county officers on charges of raping a 13 and half year old Negro girl. The fifth Free Press article is an editorial praising the statement urging quick and speedy justice by Dr. M.J. Jones, a black minister. August 11, 1960: There are five articles for this date, two from the Times, and three from the Free Press. The first Times article reports that a homemade bomb or dynamite blast damaged two Negro homes in the 400 block of 7th Ave., though no one was injured. The second Times article reports that rape charges against four 16 year old Negro boys, involving a 13.5 year old Negro girl, were dropped by the Juvenile Court Judge. The first Free Press article is an editorial which argues for the tightening of controls on explosives, in light of several bomb attacks perpetrated in Chattanooga over the past few months. The second Free Press article reports that Juvenile court Judge Burrell Barker decided today that evidence against three teenage Negro boys accused of complicity in the rape of a 17 year old girl warrants their standing trial, and he ordered their release to police, who scheduled them -- and three non-juveniles -- for a hearing in city court. The third Free press article reports that, working without tangible clues, city police were pressing a search for the bomb-thrower who touched off an explosion that shattered windows in houses occupied by Negroes in East Lake. August 12, 1960: There are eight articles for this date, five from the Times, and three from the Free Press. The first Times article reports that six young Negroes accused in the August 4 rape of a 17 year old white girl were bound over to the Hamilton County Grand Jury following a preliminary hearing before City Judge Riley Graham. Judge Graham ordered four of the defendants, charged with the rape, held without bond. The second Times article is a letter to the editor expressing pride that black voters were making progress in terms of voting more independently and not simply as part of a large bloc vote that is controlled by ward bosses. The third Times letter is a letter to the editor arguing that vigorous and stern prosecution and punishment was warranted in the Alton Park rape case, first so justice would be served, and second as a counter to segregationists who would use the case to advance their arguments. The author believed that segregationists would use the rape case as a reason integration should not occur. If proponents of integration could point to the severe and swift punishment handed down to the offenders however, they would have an effective counter to the segregationists arguments. The fourth Times article is a letter to the editor congratulating the Chattanooga Police on their swift apprehension and charging of the suspects in the Alton Park rape case. The fifth Times article reports that hours before six Negroes were held to the grand jury on charges of rape and accessory, two Negro homes were bombed -- the second time in less than three years -- on 7th Avenue.The first Free Press article reports on the arraignment hearing of the six defendants in the case of the rape of a 17 year old girl. The second Free Press article reports that lawyers for the accused rapists in the Alton Park rape case would base part of their defense on the contention that the rights of the defendants were violated because of the length of time their clients were held between the time of their arrest and their being brought before a magistrate for a hearing. The third Free Press article is a letter to the editor written by a black minister who deplores the actions of the black youths accused of raping a white girl. August 13, 1960: There are two articles for this date, one from the Times and on from the Free Press. The Times article reports that a two story vacant house at 1710 Olive St., Avondale, advertised as available for occupancy by Negroes, was damaged severely by a dynamite blast. The Free Press article reports on the same house bombing as the Times article, and adds that this bombing was the third in the past several weeks, and that the incidents may be related. August 14, 1960: There are six articles for this date, two from the Free Press and four from the Times. The first Free Press article is an editorial in which the author argues that the federal government has gained too much power, too much presence in people's lives, and is playing roles that are violative of the constitution and damaging to the work ethic and spirit of the average American citizen. The second Free Press article is an editorial decrying the violence that ripped through Avondale as a bomb was set off severely damaging a house advertised for rent to Negroes. The author demands the swiftest and most sever punishment for the perpetrators possible. The first Times article reports that a 43 year old white woman employed in a branch office of a laundry and cleaning company in the 400 block of East Ninth Street reported to police that she was raped and robbed by a Negro man in his early 20s. A medical examination at Erlanger Hospital gave credence to her report. The second Times article is a letter to the editor praising the recent integration of seven downtown lunch counters, hailing the move as progressive, intelligent, and Christian. The third Times article is an editorial and calls for a halt to the bombings of black residences, and extols the police to catch the bombers. The fourth article is a letter to the editor and praises the desegregation of seven downtown lunch counters. August 15, 1960: There are five articles for this date, three from the Times, and two from the Free Press. The first Times article is a letter to the editor in which the author expresses his concern that the men who were being tried on the rape of a 17 year old girl were not given the presumption of innocence, but were already being treated in the papers as guilty men. The second Times article is a letter to the editor in which the author expresses his gratitude and appreciation for the police department in the quick apprehension of the alleged rapists in the Alton Park rape case. The third Times article reports that a group of Negro ministers met with H.P. Dunlap, commissioner of fire and police, for more than an hour and a half concerning the recent bombings of Negro homes. The first Free Press article reports that Police Chief Ed Brown said "several suspects" had been seized in connection with the reported rape of a white woman by a Negro man in a laundry and dry cleaning establishment in the 400 block of East Ninth Street. The second Free Press article is an editorial that worries about the racial atmosphere existing in Chattanooga and speculates that the recent outbreak of crimes that have racial overtones, rapes of white women by blacks, attacks of blacks by whites, and the dynamiting of black homes, was being cause by a cycle of retributive violence that needed to be stopped. August 16, 1960: There is no material for this date. August 17, 1960:There are four articles for this date, three from the Times, and one from the Free Press. The first Times article is a letter to the editor in which the author points out that since the rape of a white girl by black youths, there had been numerous, almost daily stories in the newspapers about the case. The day after the rape of the white girl, two blacks were shot by some white people and only one story appeared about this case, the day after it happened, and then nothing else sense. The author would have liked to see equal coverage of racially motivated crimes, but obviously the papers were biased to covering black on white crime. The second Times article is a letter to the editor in which the author replies to another letter implying that the police may have forced a confession from the defendants in a recently rape case. This letter writer does not think that there were any police on the force who would behave like that, and commends the police and the citizens of Chattanooga for what he feels was their appropriate response to the rape. The third Times article reports that the Zion survey committee met at the University of Chattanooga to begin work on the 15 day survey to determine Negro College educational needs. The Free Press article is a letter, replying to an editorial. The letter writer disagreed with the characterization of an author, the subject of the editorial, as an inciter of mob violence and anarchy. August 18, 1960: There are four articles for this date, one from the Free Press, and three from the Times. The Free Press article is an editorial wondering whether or not the spree of bombings that had been taking place in Chattanooga would be stopped. The author called on the police and all law enforcement authorities to work together and do whatever it took to apprehend the suspects and bring the bombings to a halt. The first Times article reports that county police authorities disclosed that the dynamite-damaged home of a real estate salesman in Murray Hills was the target of a homemade bomb approximately eight months prior to the most recent bombing of his home. The second Times article is an editorial that laments the racial violence that had affected the city of Chattanooga since 1955. The author cites a study by the Southern Regional Council and the American Friends Service Committee that found Chattanooga was the scene of eight out of 18 instances of race-related violence from the period of 1955-58. The author cites bombings, barn burnings, and murders. The third Times article reports that a real estate agent's expensive home in the Murray Hills subdivision near Chickamauga Lake was rocked by two almost simultaneous explosions; no one was injured. August 19, 1960: There are three articles for this date, all from the Free Press. The first article reports that Chief Deputy Joe Cannon of the Hamilton County Sheriff's Office disclosed that the recent dynamiting of the Murray Hills home of a local real estate agent was the second time in about eight months. The second Free Press article is an editorial and gives mixed reviews of Nixon's speech in North Carolina. The author doesn't like the position Nixon and the GOP took on the civil rights/integration issue, but notes that Nixon did say "if you are looking for promises of what the Federal Government will do for you, you should not support me." The author liked this quote although he had some major problems with Nixon and the GOP platform as a whole. The third article is a letter to the editor written by a voter who is disappointed in the civil rights plank of the Democratic platform, and who says she will never vote for a Democrat as long as they support such civil rights legislation. August 20, 1960: There are three articles for this date, one from the Times, and two from the Free Press. The Times article reports that Chattanooga Police Commissioner H.P. Dunlap called upon all city policemen "to keep your ears and eyes open and do everything humanly possible" to solve the recent wave of bombings, rapes, robberies and break-ins. Dunlap spoke to the policemen in the city courtroom and brought up several different subjects, cautioning them to act impartially and to make sure their professional and personal conduct was above reproach. In general, the commissioner praised the conduct of the department, especially the way they handled the "racial disturbances", the sit-ins, in the Spring of 1960. The first Free Press article is a letter to the editor in which the author expresses his disappointment and frustration with Senator Lester Hill, a long-serving US Senator from Alabama, for his recent public support of the Democratic platform, and the Kennedy-Johnson Ticket. The letter writer is especially upset with the civil rights plank in the ticket, and urges Hill and his fellow Southerners to think more independently instead of always voting for Democrats regardless of their policies. The author also warns Hill and other Southern Senators that they had better wake up and start fighting for the south or else the rest of the Senate would change filibuster rules to limit debate in order to more quickly pass civil rights legislation. The second Free Press article is a piece that reports on the agreement US Attorney General Rogers had reached with several variety stores to voluntarily end their policy of segregation at the lunch counters in their southern stores. The author considers several questions relating to the agreement, such as will this mean that blacks and whites would eat together, or would the races still separated themselves voluntarily? The only companies that were mentioned in the article are Woolworth, Kress, and WT Grant, but several other reached the same agreement with the Attorney General. August 21, 1960: There are three articles for this date, all from the Times. The first article reports on the pending integration of public schools for the fall school term in New Orleans, Houston, and Knoxville, with all of these cities being forced into some level of integration by the opening of the school year as a result of Federal Court orders. The article also reports on a pending lawsuit against the public schools in Daytona Beach, FL, brought by the NAACP. The suit, described by the NAACP as the most comprehensive yet, was to serve as a model for other legal action, according to the NAACP. Th article reports that only 4,200 black children attended schools with whites in the last school year, despite Federal Court decisions mandating it. The second article reports that an early morning explosion damages a St. Elmo Negro duplex dwelling, injuring four young children slightly. This was the fifth instance of blasts attributed to racial feeling in Chattanooga since July 16, and the fourth of August. Chattanooga Mayor Olgiati announced that he would recommend a $2,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for the bombing. The third article reports on the imminent desegregation faced by cities in the Deep South, like New Orleans, for the first time. The article quotes the Southern Regional Council as saying that the outcome of these first Deep South integration tests would likely determine the outcome for integration in the south as a whole. The SRC also discusses the impact the Presidential election was having on the integration fight, as well as the waning influence of southern politicians on the national scene. August 22, 1960: There are four articles, one from the Times and three from the Free Press for this date, as well as two photographs. The Times article is an editorial denouncing the most recent in a string of bombings aimed at black homes across Chattanooga. The two photographs show some of the damage done to the bombed St. Elmo duplex, one showing a group of black men surveying the damage, and the other showing a young black woman gazing out of her front door, which was blocked by debris and chunks of her home, all the result of bomb damage. The first Free Press article reports that city detectives, already busy with investigations of safe-crackings, rapes, drownings, and mysteriously set explosions, added two robberies and an ambush shooting to their list of crimes to solve. The second Free Press article is an editorial denouncing the most recent bombing targeting blacks, the author expressing his alarm at the fact that with four children injured, the bombings seemed to be moving closer to murder. The third Free Press article is the headline for this date, "11 'Bomb Patrol' Cars Added." The article reports that police would add 11 squad cars manned by 22 officers on night patrol as city officials moved to halt bombings in racially mixed areas in the wake of the fifth explosion in the city since July. Rewards totaling $5500 were posted for information leading to the arrest of the perpetrators of the bombings, and Mayor Olgiati requested assistance from the FBI to help investigate the bombings. August 23, 1960: There are twelve articles for this date, five from the Times, four from the Free Press, and three from the Johnson City Press-Chronicle. The first Times article reports that Estes Kefauver's edge in his August 4 primary victory was officially set at 214,512. The second Times article is an editorial condemning the recent bombings in Chattanooga, and giving a bit of the history of racially motivated bombings in Tennessee and their outcomes, few suspects and fewer convictions. The author predicts that the Chattanooga bombings would likely continue, and that the police would have a very difficult time catching the perpetrators. The third Times article reports that a black man who said he had been struck with a stick by two white men was admitted to Erlanger Hospital for observation. The fourth Times article reports that the Chattanooga Kiwanis Club adopted a resolution condemning the recent bombings and asking law enforcement officials to redouble their efforts in catching the cowardly offenders. The resolution further pledged the support of the Kiwanis Club to those law enforcement officials. The fifth Times article reports that a stick of dynamite was found in the front lawn of a Red Bank apartment complex after the maintainence man ran it over while mowing the lawn. The apartment was occupied by four white families. It was unclear whether the dynamite indicated an attempt to damage the apartments, but the owner of the apartment building speculated that someone just threw the stick into the front lawn into the tall grass. The first Free Press article is an editorial l

Types:Scrapbooks | StillImage
Subjects:Public schools--Tennessee--Chattanooga | African Americans--Tennessee--Chattanooga | Civil rights--Tennessee--Chattanooga | Segregation in education--Tennessee--Chattanooga | School integration--Tennessee--Chattanooga | Race relations | Chattanooga (Tenn.)--Race relations | Hamilton County (Tenn.)--Race relations | Civil rights demonstrations--Tennessee--Chattanooga | United States, Tennessee, Hamilton County, Chattanooga, 35.045631, -85.309677
Collection:Chattanooga Sit-ins and desegregation
Institution:University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Contributors:University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Original Material:

Hamilton County Department of Education Collection

Rights and Usage:

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

Persistent Link to Item:http://chattanooga.pastperfectonline.com/archive/40E05758-2B43-4872-9F90-255446295342