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Creator:Hatfield, Edward A.
Date:2007 June 1

Encyclopedia article about legalized racial separation, which began in the 1890s when Georgia and other southern states passed a wide variety of Jim Crow laws that mandated racial segregation or separation in public facilities and effectively codified the region's tradition of white supremacy. The name "Jim Crow" refers to a minstrel character popular in the 1820s and 1830s, but it is unknown how the term came to describe the form of racial segregation and discrimination that prevailed in the American South during the first half of the twentieth century.

The Civil Rights Digital Library received support from a National Leadership Grant for Libraries awarded to the University of Georgia by the Institute of Museum and Library Services for the aggregation and enhancement of partner metadata.

Subjects:Segregation--Georgia | Race relations | Georgia--Race relations--History | Civil rights--Georgia | Segregation--Southern States | Race relations | Southern States--Race relations--History | Civil rights--Southern States | Georgia | Southern States
Collection:New Georgia Encyclopedia
Institution:New Georgia Encyclopedia
Contributors:New Georgia Encyclopedia (Project) | Georgia Humanities Council | University of Georgia. Press | Merrill-Hall New Media | GALILEO (Georgia statewide project)
Online Publisher:2007-06-01
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Cite as: "Amos T. Akerman (1821-1880)," New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved [date]: http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org.

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Forms part of the New Georgia Encyclopedia.

Persistent Link to Item:http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Article.jsp?id=h-3610